Tuesday, July 15, 2008

http://ftcuasciencelessons6.blogspot.com/

Chronicle for Higher Education 7/15/08

* Research Compliance Officer
University of Arkansas at Little Rock (Arkansas)
(date posted: 7/15/2008)
http://chronicle.com/jobs/id.php?id=0000566314-01&pg=e

I am not a medical doctor but I sure try to understand biology and effects of whatever but I would not suggest taking bad drugs.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anaphylaxis

Also,

what happens if the sugar goes to the brain? glucose to the brain? barriers?

http://scienceweek.com/2004/sc041112-4.htm

positron emission tomography

http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S002604950500106X

Elsevier Article Locator

You have requested access to the following article:
Brain glucose concentrations in poorly controlled diabetes mellitus as measured by high-field magnetic resonance spectroscopy .
Metabolism , Volume 54 , Issue 8 , Pages 1008 - 1013
E . R. Seaquist , I . Tkac , G . Damberg , W . Thomas , R . Gruetter

To view this article, please choose one of your preferred Elsevier websites:

Access to the full-text of this article will depend on your personal or institutional entitlements.

Preferred Websites

Article via ScienceDirect

Article via Elsevier Health Sciences - Elsevier imprints, theclinics.com, and ophsource.org

Article via Elsevier's Beta Program - Patient Research

To skip this screen in the future, update your preferred Elsevier websites . To learn more, read help

Update My Preferred Elsevier Websites

Abstract

Hyperglycemia and diabetes alter the function and metabolism of many tissues. The effect on the brain remains poorly defined, but some animal data suggest that chronic hyperglycemia reduces rates of brain glucose transport and/or metabolism. To address this question in human beings, we measured glucose in the occipital cortex of patients with poorly controlled diabetes and healthy volunteers at the same levels of plasma glucose using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Fourteen patients with poorly controlled diabetes (hemoglobin A1c = 9.8% ± 1.7%, mean ± SD) and 14 healthy volunteers similar with respect to age, sex, and body mass index were studied at a plasma glucose of 300 mg/dL. Brain glucose concentrations of patients with poorly controlled diabetes were lower but not statistically different from those of control subjects (4.7 ± 0.9 vs 5.3 ± 1.1 μmol/g wet wt; P = .1). Our sample size gave 80% power to detect a difference as small as 1.1 μmol/g wet wt. We conclude that chronic hyperglycemia in diabetes does not alter brain glucose concentrations in human subjects.

Copyright © 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Feedback | About Article Finder | Help

Question: Levitation and Gravity

Levitation is when you achieve O or little gravity on Earth.

Mind over Matter.

Noveau XRF and x-ray radiography all in one

Possible New Invention if not already done

XRF and xray radiography all in one with the proper choice of sensors.

NanoProbe Biochemical Indicators and others

I am looking at the real tangible non sci fi non invasive no needles determination of the biochemical compositions of fluids and others like a miniaturized biochip or nanosensors or bionanosensor or nanoprobe in advance of microprobe.

No need to cut up anything, just like whole body counting; just like xray fluorescence with improved sensitivities or minimum detection limits;

http://www.pnas.org/content/103/17/6419.full

http://www.nanoprobes.com/Vol5_Iss11.html

Monday, July 14, 2008

Variations of the Pontifical Academy of Medicine and Dentistry

http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=pontifical+of+medicine+and+dentistry&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

Pontifical Academy of Sciences

http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=pontifical+of+science&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8

http://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/pontifical_academies/acdscien/index.htm

NANOSENSORS and BIOCHIPS

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nanosensors

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biochip

NOVA Series-PBS

Begin forwarded message:
From: owner-nova-sciencenow@franz.wgbh.org (NOVA scienceNOW)
Date: July 14, 2008 11:54:36 AM EDT
To: nova-sciencenow@franz.wgbh.org (NOVA scienceNOW Bulletin)
Subject: [NOVA scienceNOW] July 16, 2008

_____________________________________________________________________
Next on NOVA scienceNOW
With Neil deGrasse Tyson

http://www.pbs.org/nova/sciencenow/

Wednesday, July 16 at 9 p.m.
(Check your local listings as dates and times may vary.)

Examine bird songs and what they tell us about language, learn how
violent space weather causes the northern lights, see how structural
engineers are developing "smart" bridges, and meet neuroboticist Yoky
Matsuoka, who is developing a robotic hand that could one day be
controlled by brain signals.

Bird Brains
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/sciencenow/0304/01.html
Clues to the origins of human language are turning up in the
brains of birds.

Space Storms
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/sciencenow/0304/02.html
Behind the dazzling display of the aurora borealis are space
storms that could turn the lights off here on Earth.

Profile: Yoky Matsuoka
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/sciencenow/0304/03.html
A former tennis prodigy aims to create advanced prosthetic limbs
controlled by human thought.

Smart Bridges
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/sciencenow/0304/04.html
Can we engineer bridges that tell us what's wrong with them
before it's too late?

The journey continues on the NOVA scienceNOW Web site. Watch the
entire hour-long episode online starting July 17. E-mail scientists
from the broadcast with your questions, see if you can match eight
different songs and calls to the correct birds, see a gallery of
auroras and hear the eerie sounds they make, and watch video extras.

Also, Links & Books, the Teacher's Guide, the program transcript,
and more:

http://www.pbs.org/nova/sciencenow

_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________

Thank you for visiting NOVA scienceNOW. We welcome your questions,
comments, and feedback. You can send a message directly to NOVA
scienceNOW at
novasciencenow@wgbh.org

Or use our feedback form at
http://www.pbs.org/nova/sciencenow/feedback/

You are subscribed to the NOVA scienceNOW mailing list.

Funding for NOVA scienceNOW is provided by Pfizer, the National
Science Foundation, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Alfred
P. Sloan Foundation, and public television viewers.
_____________________________________________________________________

Sunday, July 13, 2008

http://www.bnl.gov/community/summer_sunday.asp

http://www.bnl.gov/community/summer_sunday.asp

Brookhaven National Laboratory, home to six Nobel Prizes, invites you to explore a different scientific facility each week, witness the Whiz Bang Science Show, and try your hand at the "Brain Teasers" exhibit. During your fun-filled Summer Sunday, we hope that you discover your "inner scientist" and that our passion for discovery becomes yours!
July 20 - National Synchrotron Light Source
See the brightest light on Long Island and one of the most intense sources of light in the world. Find out how synchrotron light is used to look into all kinds of materials, from moon rocks to computer chips.

July 27 - Science learning Center
Play with science, no matter what your age. Have fun testing your hands-on science skills. Enjoy a science magician

August 3 - National Weather Service
Come to the weather forecasting office for the entire New York metropolitan area. Track storms, big or small. Learn about hurricane-preparedness. Witness a 3:30 p.m. weather-balloon launch.

August 10 - Center for Functional Nanomaterials
Visit a new center where studies of the ultra-small may lead to ultra-big discoveries in many areas, from energy to electronics. See the high-tech tools used to explore the nanoscale.*

August 17 - Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider
Enter the underground tunnel that holds twin accelerators. Learn how gold ions are smashed together to recreate the temperature and energy density of the early universe.*

*Appropriate for children over 10 years old.

Every Sunday:
Whiz Bang Science Show!
'Brain Teasers' Hands-on Exhibit

Free! No reservations needed.
Arrive any time between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. All visitors age 16 and over must bring a photo ID.

Call (631) 344-2651 or visit www.bnl.gov. Handicapped accessible. 1.5 miles north of LIE Exit 68. See maps & directions online.

Whiz Bang Science Show every week!

Friday, July 11, 2008

Lasers

Dear Florence,

Here are answers to your laser questions.

1. Can you cut trees with lasers?

No. The power requirements would be greater than any current industrial
laser can produce. This is not because the tree is resistant to laser light
it is because of the thickness of the tree. Also there would be laser safety
issues that would have to be addressed.

2. Is there laser proof material?

Yes and no. Good old fashion drywall will stop a pretty powerful beam.
There are companies that make laser barrier material that can stop a beam.
If a laser beam has an optical power in the Megawatt or higher range it
becomes harder to find material that can stop the beam without the material
catching on fire or being blasted away.

3. Does the military have lasers that can destroy a missile?

Yes! The air force has the Airborne Laser System or ABL that was designed to
shoot down an incoming ballistic missile. The testing conducted so far has
proven to be an effective way to shoot down an intercontinental ballistic
missile.

4. Flash Photolysis?

Flash Photolysis is a pump-probe technique, in which a laser of nanosecond,
picosecond, or femtosecond pulse width is excited by a short-pulse light
source such as a flash lamp.

I hope this answers your questions.

Best regards,


Gus Anibarro
Education Manager
Laser Institute of America
Phone: 407-380-1553
Fax: 407-380-5588
Email: gus@laserinstitute.org
www.laserinstitute.org

Lasers

Dear Florence,

Here are answers to your laser questions.

1. Can you cut trees with lasers?

No. The power requirements would be greater than any current industrial
laser can produce. This is not because the tree is resistant to laser light
it is because of the thickness of the tree. Also there would be laser safety
issues that would have to be addressed.

2. Is there laser proof material?

Yes and no. Good old fashion drywall will stop a pretty powerful beam.
There are companies that make laser barrier material that can stop a beam.
If a laser beam has an optical power in the Megawatt or higher range it
becomes harder to find material that can stop the beam without the material
catching on fire or being blasted away.

3. Does the military have lasers that can destroy a missile?

Yes! The air force has the Airborne Laser System or ABL that was designed to
shoot down an incoming ballistic missile. The testing conducted so far has
proven to be an effective way to shoot down an intercontinental ballistic
missile.

4. Flash Photolysis?

Flash Photolysis is a pump-probe technique, in which a laser of nanosecond,
picosecond, or femtosecond pulse width is excited by a short-pulse light
source such as a flash lamp.

I hope this answers your questions.

Best regards,


Gus Anibarro
Education Manager
Laser Institute of America
Phone: 407-380-1553
Fax: 407-380-5588
Email: gus@laserinstitute.org
www.laserinstitute.org

NanoMedicine 2008-2009

Dear Dr. Cua-Christman,

We are organizing the "International Academy of Nanomedicine (IANM)". I would like to invite you to be the "Founding Member" of IANM. The mission of IANM is to increase international collaboration and communication of nanomedicine research and improve global clinical approaches of nanomedicine research. We expect that the Founding Member of IANM will actively invite the nanomedicine research colleagues in each country and institute to join this international academy. The IANM is the sister academy of American Academy of Nanomedicine. The First Meeting of IANM will be held with Fourth Annual Meeting of American Academy of Nanomedicine (AANM) during September 4-7, 2008 in Washington DC. Currently we have Founding Members of IANM from Asian-Pacific, European and Northern American countries and they already put this important meeting information in their website. Please let me know your opinion regarding this invitation ASAP.

Thank you very much for your consideration. I am looking forward to hearing from you soon.

Best regards,

Chiming Wei, MD, PhD
President, American Academy of Nanomedicine (AANM)
Organizer, International Academy of Nanomedicine (IANM)
--
Sincerely,

Tia Gao
Coordinator, American Academy of Nanomedicine
___________________________________________________________________________________________________

http://www.nanomedicinesummit.org/































2008 Cleveland NanoMedicine Summit
Date: Thursday, September 25-Friday, September 26, 2008
Location: The Ritz Carlton,1515 West Third Street, Cleveland, OH 44113
Reservations: 800-241-3333 or 216-623-1300

The 2008 Cleveland NanoMedicine Summit, is the anchor event for Nano Week in Cleveland (in its fifth year) and will be co-hosted by NorTech's Nano-Network, the Cleveland Clinic Foundation and Case Western Reserve University. This conference has been incredibly successful in the past (as evidenced by national media attention and feedback from attendees) by bringing together scientists, clinicians, business professionals, investors and others to learn, discuss and interact under the umbrella of nanomedicine. We expect this year’s conference to be held over the course of two days on Thursday and Friday, September 25 and 26 at the Ritz Carlton in Cleveland, Ohio.

The 2008 Summit will focus on the use of nanoparticles for diagnostics and therapeutics. Session highlights include:
• Imaging cancer
• Drug delivery for cancer
• Biological investigation with nanoparticles
• Basic research using nanoparticle building blocks for nanomedicine
• Nanoparticles for gene therapy



Alexis R. Abramson, Ph.D.
Senior Fellow, NorTech
Executive Director of the Nano Network
Assistant Professor, Case Western Reserve University
James Basilion, Ph.D.
Associate Professor Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering
Director, NFCR Center for Molecular Imaging at Case
Case Western Reserve University

Vinod Labhasetwar, Ph.D.
Professor and Head, Division of BioMEMS and NanoMedicine
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Cleveland Clinic

Shuvo Roy, Ph.D.
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Cleveland Clinic

Maciej Zborowski, Ph.D.
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Cleveland Clinic
















http://www.zingconferences.com/index.cfm?page=conference&intConferenceID=45&type=conference
























Home

About

Conference list

Contact


Nanomedicine Conference 2009

Nanomedicine and Nanotoxicology

Everything included from $625; conference, accommodation, food, drink, social events, etc.
SAVE $200; register at the earlybird rate.
Register now (

) to secure your place.

2008: 565 delegates, 10 conferences. Read the feedback


March 2008 highlights

View full size (3 min.)
Chair
Nick Quirke (Imperial College London and University College, Dublin)
Location
The Jolly Beach Resort (***+)
Bolans Village
Antigua and Barbuda
Travel, Visas and attractions




Complex




Conference




Restaurant




Room
Date
Sunday January 25 2009 - Wednesday January 28 2009
Synopsis
Nanomedicine is the medical application of nanotechnology. Applications range from drug delivery, through diagnostic sensing and imaging to surgery. Many of the properties advantageous for medicine are also potential toxicological problems. For example cell damage or inflammatory lung injury, due to exposure to nanoparticles able to penetrate the body. Indeed the two fields, nanomedine and nanotoxicology could be considered two sides of the same coin. The conference will address progress and prospects for nanomedicine and nanotoxicology including, drug delivery, imaging and diagnostics, cancer, tissue engineering, interactions of nanomaterials with living tissue, and nanotoxicology. A preliminary programme of invited talks (contributed talks will be included at a later stage) is given below:
Nanomedicines
Development of Novel Polymer Therapeutics as Nanomedicines (Ruth Duncan)
Characterization of nanomaterials intended for cancer therapeutics and diagnostics (Scott McNeil)
Understanding, diagnosis and treatment of vascular disease (Shervanthi Homer-Vanniasinkam)
Cell/Nanomaterial Interactions
The nature of the interaction between nanoscale structures and living matter. (Kenneth Dawson)
Designing biomolecular/nanomaterial interactions (Vicki Colvin)
Nanomaterials for tissue regeneration (Molly Stevens)
Nanotoxicology
Standardisation of methods and metrology for nanoparticle toxicology (Alexandre Cuenat)
Toxicology of Airborne Environmental and Occupational Particles (Gunter Oberdorster)
Plenary speakers
Alexandre Cuenat (National Physical Laboratory)
Gunter Oberdorster (University of Rochester)
Kenneth Dawson (University College Dublin)
Molly Stevens (Imperial College London)
Ruth Duncan (Cardiff University)
Polymer Therapeutics as Nanomedicines: Lab to Clinic
Scott McNeil (National Cancer Institute)
Shervanthi Homer-Vanniasinkam (Leeds General Infirmary)
Vicki Colvin (Rice University)
Oral presentations
To be considered for a speaking slot you must submit your abstract by: Friday September 26 2008.
Submit your abstract now or to secure your place at the conference, register now.
Schedule
See below

Advertising Opportunities
Please contact us to discuss advertising & sponsorship opportunities at the Nanomedicine conference.


Register now (

) to secure your place.
Fees

Everything included from $625; conference, accommodation, food, drink, social events, etc.


Register
Academic
Student
Asia-Pac
Industrial
Payment deadline
Earlybird


Register
$999
(All-inclusive package)
$625
(All-inclusive package)
$899
(All-inclusive package)
(Eligible countries)
$1299
(All-inclusive package)
Sunday October 26 2008
Standard

$1199
(All-inclusive package)
$699
(All-inclusive package)
$1099
(All-inclusive package)
(Eligible countries)
$1450
(All-inclusive package)
Friday December 26 2008

All-inclusive package (conference, accommodation, food, drink, social events, etc.)

Multiple attendance discount: 3 or more members from the same lab are eligible for a discount. Please contact us.
Multiple conference discount: We can offer you a discount if you wish to attend multiple conferences. Please contact us.

Extras



Adult
Children
(12-17) (3-11) (0-2)
Deadline
Extra nights
$160
$95 $50 $0
Friday December 26 2008
Accompanying (Earlybird)
$425
$275 $150 $0
Sunday October 26 2008
Accompanying (Standard)
$475
$325 $175 $0
Friday December 26 2008

Specially-negotiated all-inclusive rates
(including all items listed below, excluding the conference)



Accommodation upgrades
The above registration fees provide you with accommodation in a normal (Supersaver) en-suite room.
We have negotiated special rates on upgrades to higher room classes.
You can purchase room upgrades when you register.
· Upgrade to Standard: $55 per room per night
· Upgrade to Superior: $130 per room per night
Details of the accommodation types at the resort can be found on their website.
Flights

Scheduled Flights
There are regular scheduled flights from New York (daily), Toronto, San Juan (Puerto Rico; multiple times daily) and London (daily). There are also direct flights from Frankfurt (Germany; Condor) and Boston (USA; American Airlines) and good connections from Paris (Air France) through various Caribbean islands with Caribbean Airlines.
Charter Flights
There are also many direct charter flights from the US, Canada and Europe.
Do a Google search for charter flights Antigua.
Current scheduled flight options & costs
Departure city / airport code:
Only 168 days until registration closes. Register now.

Items included in Nanomedicine conference 2009 fee
· Conference
· Abstract submission
· ***+ accommodation for 3 nights
· All group meals (breakfast, lunch, dinner)
· Unlimited local alcoholic beverages and soft drinks (24 hours)
· All refreshments & social events
· Non-motorized watersports
· and more....



Get updates and reminders for Nanomedicine conference 2009
First Name
Family Name
Email Address
Country
City
Organization
Zip / Post Code
Dept / Bldg





- Select -

Afghanistan

Albania

Algeria

American samoa

Andorra

Angola

Anguilla

Antarctica

Antigua and Barbuda

Argentina

Armenia

Aruba

Australia

Austria

Azerbaijan

Bahamas

Bahrain

Bangladesh

Barbados

Belarus

Belgium

Belize

Benin

Bermuda

Bhutan

Bolivia

Bosnia and herzegovina

Botswana

Bouvet island

Brazil

British indian ocean territory

Brunei darussalam

Bulgaria

Burkina faso

Burundi

Cambodia

Cameroon

Canada

Cape verde

Cayman islands

Central african republic

Chad

Chile

China

Christmas island

Cocos (keeling) islands

Colombia

Comoros

Congo

Cook islands

Costa rica

Cote d'ivoire

Croatia

Cuba

Cyprus

Czech Republic

Denmark

Djibouti

Dominica

Dominican republic

East timor

Ecuador

Egypt

El salvador

Equatorial guinea

Eritrea

Estonia

Ethiopia

Falkland islands (malvinas)

Faroe islands

Fiji

Finland

France

French guiana

French polynesia

Gabon

Gambia

Georgia

Germany

Ghana

Gibraltar

Greece

Greenland

Grenada

Guadeloupe

Guam

Guatemala

Guinea

Guinea-bissau

Guyana

Haiti

Heard and mc donald islands

Honduras

Hong Kong

Hungary

Iceland

India

Indonesia

Iran

Iraq

Ireland

Israel

Italy

Jamaica

Japan

Jordan

Kazakhstan

Kenya

Kiribati

Korea, dem. people's rep. of

Korea, Republic of

Kuwait

Kyrgystan

Lao people's dem. rep.

Latvia

Lebanon

Lesotho

Liberia

Libyan arab jamahiriya

Liechtenstein

Lithuania

Luxembourg

Macau

Madagascar

Malawi

Malaysia

Maldives

Mali

Malta

Marshall islands

Martinique

Mauritania

Mauritius

Mayotte

Mexico

Micronesia

Moldova

Monaco

Mongolia

Montserrat

Morocco

Mozambique

Myanmar

Namibia

Nauru

Nepal

Netherlands

Netherlands antilles

Neutral zone

New caledonia

New Zealand

Nicaragua

Niger

Nigeria

Niue

Norfolk island

Northern mariana islands

Norway

Oman

Pakistan

Palau

Panama

Papua new guinea

Paraguay

Peru

Philippines

Pitcairn

Poland

Portugal

Puerto Rico

Qatar

Reunion

Romania

Russian federation

Rwanda

Saint helena

Saint kitts and nevis

Saint lucia

Saint pierre and miquelon

Samoa

San marino

Sao tome and principe

Saudi Arabia

Senegal

Seychelles

Sierra leone

Singapore

Slovakia

Slovenia

Solomon islands

Somalia

South Africa

Spain

Sri lanka

Sudan

Suriname

Swaziland

Sweden

Switzerland

Syrian arab republic

Taiwan

Tajikistan

Tanzania, united republic of

Thailand

Togo

Tokelau

Tonga

Trinidad & Tob

Tunisia

Turkey

Turkmenistan

Turks and caicos islands

Tuvalu

U.A.E

Uganda

Ukraine

United Kingdom

United States

Uruguay

Uzbekistan

Vanuatu

Vatican city state (holy see)

Venezuela

Vietnam

Virgin Islands (GB)

Virgin Islands (US)

Wallis and futuna islands

Western sahara

Yemen

Yugoslavia

Zaire

Zambia

Zimbabwe







Register now.
Tell a friend or colleague about our Nanomedicine conference 2009
Friend / Colleague name
Friend / Colleague Email
Your name






Register now.

Nanomedicine conference 2009 schedule

Sunday January 25
Monday January 26
Tuesday January 27
Wednesday January 28
17:30 - 19:00 Session 1
19:00 Dinner reception
6:30 - 8:30 Breakfast
8:30 - 10:30 Session 2
10:30 - 12:30 Poster session

12:30 - 16:30 Lunch & free time

16:30 - 18:10 Session 3
18:10 - 18:40 Informal discussions + refreshment
18:40 - 19:40 Session 4
19:40 Dine-around (choice of hotel restaurant)
6:30 - 8:30 Breakfast
8:30 - 10:30 Session 5
10:30 - 11:00 Informal discussions + refreshment
11:00 - 12:30 Session 6
12:30 - 17:30 Lunch & free time

17:30 - 19:30 Session 7
19:30 Beachside group dinner
6:30 - 8:30 Breakfast
8:30 - 10:30 Session 8
10:30 - 11:00 Informal discussions + refreshment
11:00 - 12:30 Session 9

12:30 Lunch & departures
Register now.
Get updates and reminders for Nanomedicine conference 2009
First Name
Family Name
Email Address
Country
City
Organization
Zip / Post Code
Dept / Bldg





- Select -

Afghanistan

Albania

Algeria

American samoa

Andorra

Angola

Anguilla

Antarctica

Antigua and Barbuda

Argentina

Armenia

Aruba

Australia

Austria

Azerbaijan

Bahamas

Bahrain

Bangladesh

Barbados

Belarus

Belgium

Belize

Benin

Bermuda

Bhutan

Bolivia

Bosnia and herzegovina

Botswana

Bouvet island

Brazil

British indian ocean territory

Brunei darussalam

Bulgaria

Burkina faso

Burundi

Cambodia

Cameroon

Canada

Cape verde

Cayman islands

Central african republic

Chad

Chile

China

Christmas island

Cocos (keeling) islands

Colombia

Comoros

Congo

Cook islands

Costa rica

Cote d'ivoire

Croatia

Cuba

Cyprus

Czech Republic

Denmark

Djibouti

Dominica

Dominican republic

East timor

Ecuador

Egypt

El salvador

Equatorial guinea

Eritrea

Estonia

Ethiopia

Falkland islands (malvinas)

Faroe islands

Fiji

Finland

France

French guiana

French polynesia

Gabon

Gambia

Georgia

Germany

Ghana

Gibraltar

Greece

Greenland

Grenada

Guadeloupe

Guam

Guatemala

Guinea

Guinea-bissau

Guyana

Haiti

Heard and mc donald islands

Honduras

Hong Kong

Hungary

Iceland

India

Indonesia

Iran

Iraq

Ireland

Israel

Italy

Jamaica

Japan

Jordan

Kazakhstan

Kenya

Kiribati

Korea, dem. people's rep. of

Korea, Republic of

Kuwait

Kyrgystan

Lao people's dem. rep.

Latvia

Lebanon

Lesotho

Liberia

Libyan arab jamahiriya

Liechtenstein

Lithuania

Luxembourg

Macau

Madagascar

Malawi

Malaysia

Maldives

Mali

Malta

Marshall islands

Martinique

Mauritania

Mauritius

Mayotte

Mexico

Micronesia

Moldova

Monaco

Mongolia

Montserrat

Morocco

Mozambique

Myanmar

Namibia

Nauru

Nepal

Netherlands

Netherlands antilles

Neutral zone

New caledonia

New Zealand

Nicaragua

Niger

Nigeria

Niue

Norfolk island

Northern mariana islands

Norway

Oman

Pakistan

Palau

Panama

Papua new guinea

Paraguay

Peru

Philippines

Pitcairn

Poland

Portugal

Puerto Rico

Qatar

Reunion

Romania

Russian federation

Rwanda

Saint helena

Saint kitts and nevis

Saint lucia

Saint pierre and miquelon

Samoa

San marino

Sao tome and principe

Saudi Arabia

Senegal

Seychelles

Sierra leone

Singapore

Slovakia

Slovenia

Solomon islands

Somalia

South Africa

Spain

Sri lanka

Sudan

Suriname

Swaziland

Sweden

Switzerland

Syrian arab republic

Taiwan

Tajikistan

Tanzania, united republic of

Thailand

Togo

Tokelau

Tonga

Trinidad & Tob

Tunisia

Turkey

Turkmenistan

Turks and caicos islands

Tuvalu

U.A.E

Uganda

Ukraine

United Kingdom

United States

Uruguay

Uzbekistan

Vanuatu

Vatican city state (holy see)

Venezuela

Vietnam

Virgin Islands (GB)

Virgin Islands (US)

Wallis and futuna islands

Western sahara

Yemen

Yugoslavia

Zaire

Zambia

Zimbabwe









Register now.
Privacy Policy | Terms & Conditions | Meeting list

© Zing 2007 - 2008

Thursday, July 10, 2008

Spinoff of NASA

http://www.thespaceplace.com/nasa/spinoffs.html

How Stuff Works-http://www.howstuffworks.com

http://science.howstuffworks.com/physical-science-channel.htm

LIA Membership Directory

http://www.laserinstitute.org/membership/directory

Direct Industry

http://www.directindustry.com/

Forestry and Others

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/CCL-144-34.500-p4.html

Laser Institute of America(LIA)

http://www.laserinstitute.org/

Lasers used to Cutting Many Different Kinds of Materials

http://www.thomasnet.com/nsearch.html?cov=NA&heading=43277201&WT.mc_t=PPC&WT.mc_n=mcgoog&WT.sem_engine=mcgoog&WT.sem_keyword=laser+cutting&WT.srch=1&mctoken=v4v43576Z3a429569662608656673Z3a7Z3a2Z3aZ3aZ3a1662Z3aZ3a

Toxic Dioxin and Irritant, Flammable Dioxane

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dioxin

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dioxane

Endosulfan should be banned in the Philippines.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endosulfan

Shenzhen Lightstar Laser Technology Co. Ltd

http://www.laser999.cn/e/?gclid=CMGbzf-etpQCFQOuFQodLlEXTQ

MonoAmmonium Phosphate (MAP)

Monoammonium phosphate (MAP)




7-10-2008 Thursday |Homepage |Contact us

| Description | Specification | Application | Packing&Storage | MSDS | Their raw mateiral | Their end products| Substitute | Rules of the goods |

HomePage
Description
Spec
Application
Packing
MSDS
Raw material
End product
Substitute
Rules
TOP
Description of Monoammonium phosphate (MAP)
Formula of Monoammonium phosphate (MAP): NH4H2PO4
F.W. of Monoammonium phosphate (MAP): 115.02
CAS no. of Monoammonium phosphate (MAP): 7722-76-1
DOT of Monoammonium phosphate (MAP): Nill
NFPA no. of Monoammonium phosphate (MAP): 2-0-0
Class no.of Monoammonium phosphate (MAP): Nill
UN no. of Monoammonium phosphate (MAP): Nill
HS code of Monoammonium phosphate (MAP): 31054000
Specific Gravity of Monoammonium phosphate (MAP): 1.8

Monoammonium phosphate (MAP) Properties:
White granular crystal; relative density at 1.803, melting point at 190degree C, easily soluble in water, slightly soluble in alcohol, insoluble in ketone, PH value of 1% solution is 4.5.
Specification of Monoammonium phosphate (MAP)
Industrial Grade
Items
Specification
Main contents%min
99.0
Phosphorus pentoxide%min
61.0
Nitrogen, as N %min
11.8
PH value (1% solution)
4.4-4.8
Moisture%max
0.2
Water insoluble %max
0.10
Food Grade
Main contents%min
99.0
Phosphorus pentoxide% min
61.0
Nitrogen, as N % min
11.8
PH value (1% solution)
4.4-4.8
Moisture% max
0.2
Heavy metal, as Pb%max
0.001
Arsenic as As% max
0.0003
Fluoride as F% max
0.005
Water insoluble %max
0.10
Application of Monoammonium phosphate (MAP)
Monoammonium phosphate (MAP) is used as a fire-prevention agent for fabric, timber and paper, as well as a fire-prevention coating, and dry powder for fire extinguisher. For food grade it is mainly used as a fermentation agent, nourishment, and so on. Used as a high effective non-chloride N, P compound fertilizer in agriculture. Its total nourishment (N=P2O5) is at 73%, and may be used as a basic raw material for N, P and K compound fertilizer
Packing&Storage of Monoammonium phosphate (MAP)
Packing of Monoammonium phosphate (MAP):
Plastic-woven sack, net weight at 25kg, 50kg or 1,000kg.
Storage of Monoammonium phosphate (MAP):
Store in an area that is cool, dry, well-ventilated, Store in closed containers.

MSDS of Monoammonium phosphate (MAP)
Material Safety Data Sheets of Monoammonium phosphate (MAP)

Chemical Name or Synonym: AMMONIUM PHOSPHATE, PRIMARY; AMMONIUM
PHOSPHATE, MONOBASIC
Molecular Formula: NH4H2PO4
CAS Number: 7722-76-1
Composition/Information on ingredients
OSHA
Component Hazard Percentage
MONOAMMONIUM PHOSPHATE N 100
1 HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION
Physical Appearance and Odor:
white powder solid, odorless.
Warning Statements:
Based on currently available data, this product does not meet the regulatory definition of a hazardous substance. However, good industrial hygiene practices should be used in handling it.
Potential health effects:
Acute Eye: May cause irritation.
Acute Skin: Slightly irritating.
Acute Inhalation: Dusts may cause upper respiratory tract irritation.
Acute Ingestion: May cause abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea.
Chronic Effects: This product does not contain any ingredient as probable or suspected
human carcinogens.

2 FIRST AID MEASURES
First aid measures for accidental:
Eye Exposure:
Hold eyelids open and flush with a steady, gentle stream of water for at least 15 minutes. Seek medical attention if irritation develops or persists or if visual changes occur.
Skin Exposure:
In case of contact, wash with plenty of soap and water. Seek medical attention if irritation develops or persists.
Inhalation:
If respiratory irritation or distress occurs remove victim to fresh air. Seek medical attention if respiratory irritation or distress continues.
Ingestion:
If victim is conscious and alert, give 2-3 glasses of water to drink and do not induce vomiting. Seek immediate medical attention. Do not leave victim unattended. To prevent aspiration of swallowed product, lay victim on side with head lower than waist. Vomiting may occur spontaneously. If vomiting occurs and the victim is conscious, give water to further dilute the chemical.
Medical conditions possibly aggravated by exposure:
Inhalation of product may aggravate existing chronic respiratory problems such as asthma, emphysema or bronchitis. Skin contact may aggravate existing skin disease.
Notes to physician:
All treatments should be based on observed signs and symptoms of distress in the patient. Consideration should be given to the possibility that overexposure to materials other than this product may have occurred.
Ingestion of large quantities of phosphate salts (over 1.0 grams for an adult) may cause an osmotic catharsis resulting in diarrhea and probable abdominal cramps. Larger doses such as 4-8 grams will almost certainly cause these effects in everyone. In healthy individuals most of the ingested salt will be excreted in the feces with the diarrhea and, thus, not cause any systemic toxicity. Doses greater than 10 grams hypothetically may cause systemic toxicity. Treatment should take into consideration both anionic and cation portion of the molecule. The following treatments should be considered for the specific group(s) of phosphate salts found in this product:
--All phosphate salts, except calcium salts, have a hypothetical risk of hypocalcemia, so calcium levels should be monitored.
--Ammonium salts have a hypothetical risk of ammonia toxicity. In addition to calcium levels, ammonia and phosphate levels should be monitored.
--Potassium salts have a hypothetical risk of hyperkalemia which can cause cardiac arrhythmia. In addition to calcium levels, potassium and phosphate levels should be monitored. Also consider continuous EKG monitoring to detect hyperkalemia.
--Sodium salts have a hypothetical risk of hypernatremia. In addition to calcium levels, sodium and phosphate levels should be monitored.

3 FIRE FIGHTING MEASURES
Fire hazard data:
Flash Point:
Not Applicable
Extinguishing Media:
Not combustible. Use extinguishing method suitable for surrounding fire.
Special Fire Fighting Procedures:
Firefighters should wear NIOSH/MSHA approved self-contained breathing apparatus and full protective clothing. Dike area to prevent runoff and contamination of water sources. Dispose of fire control water later.
Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:
Hazardous Decomposition Materials (Under Fire Conditions): oxides of nitrogen oxides of phosphorus
Hazardous Decomposition Materials (Under Fire Conditions):
oxides of nitrogen
oxides of phosphorus

4 ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES
Evacuation Procedures and Safety:
Wear appropriate protective gear for the situation. See Personal Protection information in Section 6.
Containment of Spill:
Dike or retain dilution water or water from firefighting for later disposal. Follow procedure described below under Cleanup and Disposal of Spill.
Cleanup and Disposal of Spill:
Sweep or vacuum up and place in an appropriate closed container (see Section 5: Handling and Storage). Clean up residual material by washing area with water and detergent. DO NOT RETURN MATERIAL TO ITS ORIGINAL CONTAINER.
Environmental and Regulatory Reporting:
Prevent material from entering public sewer system or any waterways.

5 HANDLING AND STORAGE
Minimum/Maximum Storage Temperatures:
Not Available
Handling:
Avoid direct or prolonged contact with skin and eyes.
Storage:
Store in an area that is cool, dry, well-ventilated, Store in closed containers.

6 EXPOSURE CONTROLS/PERSONAL PROTECTION
Introductory Remarks:
These recommendations provide general guidance for handling this product. Because specific work environments and material handling practices vary, safety procedures should be developed for each intended application. While developing safe handling procedures, do not overlook the need to clean equipment and piping systems for maintenance and repairs. Waste resulting from these procedures should be handled in accordance with Section 11: Disposal Considerations.
Assistance with selection, use and maintenance of worker protection equipment is generally available from equipment manufacturers.
Exposure Guidelines:
Exposure limits represent regulated or recommended worker breathing zone concentrations measured by validated sampling and analytical methods, meeting the regulatory requirements. The following limits apply to this material, where, if indicated, S=skin and C=ceiling limit:
PARTICULATES NOT OTHERWISE REGULATED RESPIRABLE FRACTION Notes TWA STEL
OSHA 5 mg/cu m
PARTICULATES NOT OTHERWISE REGULATED TOTAL DUST
Notes TWA STEL
OSHA 15 mg/cu m
Engineering Controls:
Where engineering controls are indicated by use conditions or a potential for excessive exposure exists, the following traditional exposure control techniques may be used to effectively minimize employee exposures.
Respiratory Protection:
When respirators are required, select NIOSH/MSHA approved equipment based on actual or potential airborne concentrations and in accordance with the appropriate regulatory standards and/or industrial recommendations.
Eye/Face Protection:
Skin Protection:
Skin Protection:
Work Practice Controls: Personal hygiene is an important work practice exposure control measure and the following general measures should be taken when working with or handling this material:
(1) Do not store, use, and/or consume foods, beverages, tobacco products, or cosmetics in areas where this material is stored. (2) Wash hands and face carefully before eating, drinking, using tobacco, applying cosmetics, or using the toilet. (3) Wash exposed skin promptly to remove accidental splashes of contact with this material.
Work Practice Controls:
Personal hygiene is an important work practice exposure control measure and the following general measures should be taken when working with or handling this material:
(1) Do not store, use, and/or consume foods, beverages, tobacco products, or cosmetics in areas where this material is stored.
(2) Wash hands and face carefully before eating, drinking, using tobacco, applying cosmetics, or using the toilet.
(3) Wash exposed skin promptly to remove accidental splashes of contact with this material.

7 PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES
Physical and Chemical properties here represent typical properties of this product.
Physical Appearance: white powder solid.
Odor: odorless.
Specific Gravity: 1.8 at 19degree C.
Melting Point Range: Not Available
Boiling Point Range: Not Available
Vapor Pressure: Not Available
Vapor Density: Not Available
Molecular Weight: 115.02

8 STABILITY AND REACTIVITY
Chemical Stability:
This material is stable under normal handling and storage conditions described in Section 5.
Conditions To Be Avoided:
extreme heat
water
Materials/Chemicals To Be Avoided:
strong bases
sodium hypochlorite
Decomposition Temperature Range:
170 degree C
The Following Hazardous Decomposition Products Might Be Expected:
Decomposition Type: thermal
ammonia
phosphoric acid
oxides of nitrogen
oxides of phosphorus
Hazardous Polymerization Will Not Occur.
Avoid The Following To Inhibit Hazardous Polymerization: not applicable
MAP Material Safety Data Sheet
Avoid The Following To Inhibit Hazardous Polymerization: not applicable

9 TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION
Acute Eye Irritation:
No test data found for product.
Acute Skin Irritation:
Toxicological Information and Interpretation
skin - skin irritation, 500 mg, rabbit. Mildly irritating.
Acute Dermal Toxicity:
No test data found for product.
Acute Respiratory Irritation:
No test data found for product.
Acute Inhalation Toxicity:
No test data found for product.
Acute Oral Toxicity:
Toxicological Information and Interpretation
LD50 - lethal dose 50% of test species, > 1000 mg/kg, rat.
Chronic Toxicity:
This product does not contain any substances that are considered to be "probable" or "suspected" human carcinogens.

10 ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION
Ecotoxicological Information:
No data found for product.
Chemical Fate Information:
No data found for product.

11 DISPOSAL CONSIDERATIONS
Waste Disposal Method:
Chemical additions, processing or otherwise altering this material may make the waste management information presented in this MSDS incomplete, inaccurate or otherwise inappropriate. Please be advised that state and local requirements for waste disposal may be more restrictive or otherwise different from laws and regulations. Consult state and local regulations regarding the proper disposal of this material.
EPA Hazardous Waste - NO

12 OTHER INFORMATION
Key Legend Information:
OSHA - Occupational Safety and Health Administration
TWA - Time Weighted Average
STEL - Short Term Exposure Limit
ND - Not determined

Monoammonium phosphate (MAP) raw mateiral
1) Ammonia,aqueous solution and phosphoric acid
2) Ammonia,anhydrous and phosphoric acid
Monoammonium phosphate (MAP) end goods
Compond fertilizer ,Pigment blue 28(C.I.77346),pigment violet 16 (C.I.77742),zinc pyrophosphate
Substitute of Monoammonium phosphate (MAP)
DAP,Phosphoric acid,SAPP,STPP,other goods can be used in fertilizer.
Importing & exporting rules of Monoammonium phosphate (MAP)
Normal.There is no drawback for the goods in china.
<
CopyRight by Ronas Chemicals Ind.Co.,Ltd. 2006~2008 ÊñICP±¸06003934Ü£ 2006-2-13

Ronas Chemicals Ind.Co.,Ltd.
Address: NO.3,Qingjiang East Road,Qingyang District,Chengdu,Sichuan,China 610072
Tel:86-28-8995-2456;86-28-8608-2869 Fax:86-28-8608-2869

visit our website: www.ronasgroup.com
Email: ronaschem@ronasgroup.com; cdsygs@mail.sc.cninfo.net; ronaschem@gmail.com
Our parter: www.gatewaygroup.com.cn ; www.gatewaychem.com ; www.goyochem.com

MEXICO WEB














Defoliants and Dessicants

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/PI138

KGMA News 7/10/08 S&T

Roxas City -- It's "eureka" time for the science and technology sector
with the national government now giving it greater attention.

President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, keeping the momentum of her goal to
make the Philippines reach First World status in 20 years, announced
that the government is investing a special P3-billion fund in research
and development (R&D) technology between 2007 and 2010 including the
Science and Technology complex at the University of the Philippines
(UP) headed by scientists from the Association of Southeast Asian (ASEAN).

President Arroyo said this is to promote engineering R&D activities in
the country at a significant scale in order to modernize every aspect
of the economic underpinnings of the Philippines to propel economic
growth.

The message was conveyed by the Chief Executive at the July 7 opening
of the 8th ASEAN Science and Technology Week and National Science and
Technology Week and 50th DOST anniversary celebration in Metro Manila.

The special fund is in line with the S&T strategy in the Medium-Term
Philippine Development Plan (MTPDP) which seeks to further S&T and
mobilize advances through a four-pronged approach: first, enhancing
the competitiveness of the human capital; second, developing a
critical mass of scientists and R&D personnel; third, speeding up
knowledge creation and dissemination to push productivity; and fourth,
improving the mechanisms that promote technology-based entrepreneurship.

The Department of Science and Technology (DOST) is at the forefront of
this effort.

One of present concerns wherein S&T would be harnessed is ensuring
food on the table for Filipinos and putting more money in poor
people's pockets so that they can afford the higher price of food.

The programs of DOST include improving productivity in coconut areas,
wherein there are a million farmers, and harnessing alternative
products from coconut including virgin coconut oil (VCO).

The agency is speeding up the development of physico-chemical and
biological studies for VCO to ensure its high quality in international
and local markets. "We want virgin coconut oil to be as familiar in
kitchen cabinets as olive oil," stressed the President.

Through research projects carried out in various laboratories such as
those of DOST's own Industrial Technology Development Institute (ITDI)
and Ateneo de Manila University, the DOST is also carrying out
clinical tests to verify the therapeutic claims for this very simple
yet very useful coconut derivative.

In this year's national budget, President Arroyo pointed out that the
DOST received the largest percentage increase – 51 percent. She added
that R&D efforts will prioritize food and agriculture, energy, public
health, information and communication technology, and the environment
including disaster prevention. These shall advance the three priority
Es of the country – Economy, Education and Environment.

She emphasized that modernization will need a critical mass of R&D
capable manpower to bring the country to First World status. Since
last year, an S&T consortium of universities headed by UP has been
offering scholarships under the R&D program for master's and doctorate
degrees in Science and Engineering.

DOST is also granting the DOST-Science Education Institute Scholarship
for college and at the Philippine Science High School to deserving
students. Scores of students in Capiz have already availed of the
scholarship program. The Capiz National High School also has a Special
Science and Technology Class to encourage the youth to pursue S&T.

Likewise, DOST said it is ready to help inventors who have developed
new processes, products and gadgets that would help push the S&T
sector and contribute to economic development. (PIA-JSC)

__._,_.___
Messages in this topic (1) Reply (via web post) | Start a new topic
Messages | Links
-----------------------------

Visit the Website of President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo - http://www.kgma.org/gma

MARKETPLACE
You rock! Blockbuster wants to give you a complimentary trial of Blockbuster Total Access.

Change settings via the Web (Yahoo! ID required)
Change settings via email: Switch delivery to Daily Digest | Switch format to Traditional
Visit Your Group | Yahoo! Groups Terms of Use | Unsubscribe
RECENT ACTIVITY
1
New Members
Visit Your Group
Women of Curves
on Yahoo! Groups
see how women are
changing their lives.
Get in Shape
on Yahoo! Groups
Find a buddy
and lose weight.
Healthy Living
Learn to live life
to the fullest
on Yahoo! Groups.
.

__,_._,___

Wednesday, July 9, 2008

British Petroleum in the Philippines

Site Index | Contact us | Reports and publications | BP worldwide | Home

Search:
About BP
Environment and society
Products and services
Investors
Press
Careers
BP Global About BP Where we operate BP worldwide Philippines
BP in the Philippines

While we continue to develop our lubricants, marine, solar, gas and power businesses in the Philippines, we’re also helping to regenerate the fragile environment around us
What we do
The Philippines is an archipelago composed of more than 7,000 islands spread over 300,000 square kilometres in the western Pacific Ocean. This island nation, home to a growing population of 85 million people, has also been home to BP Philippines, Inc. since 1986.

Today our interests are mainly in lubricants, marine and solar energy chemicals businesses. Gas and power are other important areas we are looking into.

Our work primarily revolves around the distribution and marketing of Castrol lubricants for consumers, and for commercial, industrial, and marine market channels. We import the bulk of our products from Malaysia and sell them through a network of distributors nationwide.

BP Solar has also made an impact in Southern Philippines, where we’ve started one of the world’s largest solar power projects. Phase 1 was completed in May 2005 and now benefits around 40,000 households composed of about 240,000 individuals living in the remotest and most inaccessible locations in Mindanao. Phase 2 is ongoing and is scheduled to be completed Q1 2007.
Our people and partners
BPPI’s office is based in Makati City while the BP Solar Project Office is in Mandaue City, Cebu. Between our lubricants and solar businesses we employ 53 people, including one expatriate under BP Solar.
Community investment
The Philippines is described as not just a conservation ‘hotspot’ but the ‘hottest of the hotspots’. Many conservationists are warning that without immediate help the Philippines is on the brink of a major crisis.

That is the reason why a lot of our community efforts here are focused on the environment. For example, BP Holdings, which owned part of Bataan Polyethylene Corporation until 2005, founded the Bataan Coastal Care Foundation in 1998. Our work provided funding and support for a community-based coastal regeneration programme for Bataan, strengthening and protecting the environment with regular coastal clean-ups and the regeneration of the mangrove forests.

Our work is not limited solely to the regeneration of the environment, but also includes charitable works in the Philippines. Every month of December we sponsor a day to help a particular charity with its work. In 2005, we also donated 27 sets of furniture to different charitable institutions in Cebu City.
In this section
Contact BP in the Philippines
Work with us
Visit our careers centre and search for jobs in the Philippines
BP careers in the Philippines
back to top
© 1996-2008 BP p.l.c. | Legal Notice | Privacy Statement

Monday, July 7, 2008

FTCUA Science Lessons 5

Next on NOVA scienceNOW
With Neil deGrasse Tyson

http://www.pbs.org/nova/sciencenow/

Wednesday, July 9 at 9 p.m.
(Check your local listings as dates and times may vary.)

This broadcast looks at attempts to repair the Hubble Space
Telescope, the discovery of our earliest primate ancestors, a
dangerous bacterium that's making soldiers sick, and a profile of
neurologist and cancer researcher Dr. Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa.

Saving Hubble
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/sciencenow/0303/01.html
Two teams of spacewalkers take on the risky mission of reviving
the ailing Space Telescope.

First Primates
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/sciencenow/0303/02.html
Our most distant primate ancestors, which took the stage shortly
after the dinosaurs left it, were tree-dwellers the size of mice.

Profile: Alfredo Quinones-Hinojosa
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/sciencenow/0303/03.html
He jumped the fence from Mexico to work as a farmhand and ended
up a leading brain surgeon.

Killer Microbe
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/sciencenow/0303/04.html
A relatively benign bug becomes a highly lethal pathogen, known
to U.S. soldiers as Iraqibacter.

The journey continues on the NOVA scienceNOW Web site. Watch the
entire hour-long episode online starting July 10. E-mail scientists
from the broadcast with your questions, take a look at your family
tree over the past 55 million years, see how the Hubble Space
Telescope used raw data to create the famous Eagle Nebula image, and
watch video extras.

Also, Links & Books, the program transcript, and more:

http://www.pbs.org/nova/sciencenow

_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________

Thank you for visiting NOVA scienceNOW. We welcome your questions,
comments, and feedback. You can send a message directly to NOVA
scienceNOW at
novasciencenow@wgbh.org

Or use our feedback form at
http://www.pbs.org/nova/sciencenow/feedback/

You are subscribed to the NOVA scienceNOW mailing list.